Invalidating parents

By accepting the sad reality of one adult child’s rejection, I can better spend my time and energy on people that want my company, on interests that are meaningful and fulfilling to me, and where I can make a difference.

Recently, a parent told me she had reconciled with an estranged adult child after nearly two decades of estrangement. Like she did, you can live your life now—-—-and still hold out hope for a future reconciliation.

Acceptance may take determination, but is worth the effort.

Acceptance has allowed me the freedom to be who I truly am: A strong woman blessed with many people, including four other adult children, to love and share my life with.

When an adult child abandons parents, or in some cases the entire family, the what-ifs and how-coulds can limit recovery. But staring at the silent telephone, desperately waiting for the uncertain return of your adult child can lead to despair.

The benefits of nature to the psyche are well-documented. If getting outdoors isn’t an option, you can still focus your thoughts in a positive direction.

Be sure to experience your surroundings to the fullest, by taking notice. Perhaps recall moments from your morning that went well.

Most of us have had to accept other disappointing realities during our lives: a loved one’s death, the inability to finish college due to other responsibilities, or an unrealized professional goal.

We all have disappointments, but the vast majority of us accept reality and move forward, perhaps in more fulfilling directions.

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--- helpful forum thread --- history of childcare provision in England -- the current 2013 goverment has a focus on education and a controvertial approach 'school readiness' core purpose of surestart -- types of care provision - choosing childcare - Northern Ireland's United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) current equalities legislation - equality act 2010 current research social and economic influences such as work patterns and financial constraints -- consider how welcoming you are in daily practice, how understanding, able to give time to listen, are positive about the differences that diversity involves.

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One thought on “invalidating parents”

  1. • But taken on its own, and leaving out the context, this one is pretty much in line with the “very good not outstanding” level of work we’d already gotten in the previous two episodes. • I’d forgotten about all the many John Mc Enroe jokes. “Grow some hair, son.” • Segments two and three are low-key and fun but not hugely memorable.